Often, when faced with an unplanned pregnancy, a woman thinks she’s only got two options, abortion or parenting. Actually, there is a third option. Have you considered adoption? Making an adoption plan is not easy, but it’s made out of genuine love for your child.

Have you asked yourself these questions?

Sometimes taking a small step in one direction becomes the biggest step of your life. Making an adoption plan is difficult, but it could be a step in the right direction for you. Adoption can truly bring something beautiful and special out of a difficult situation. As you consider adoption, ask yourself these questions:

  • Am I too young to parent?
  • Do I want to finish school or continue my career?
  • How do I truly feel about abortion?
  • Do I have the support to raise this baby on my own?
  • Is it important for a child to have a two-parent family?
  • What do I know about adoption?

The adoption process

Once you’ve decided to explore adoption, you’ll want to find a reputable agency, lawyer, or another adoption specialist to work with. You need to know they have your best interests at heart so choose someone you trust.

As the expectant mother, you make all the decisions about your adoption plan. You decide who the adoptive family will be, what type of life you want for your child, and even how much contact you’d like to have as your child grows up.

In the end, you’ll have done everything possible to give your child a chance at a safe and stable home environment, a good education, financial security, and a happy life.

Types of adoption plans

There is no right or wrong when it comes to making an adoption plan for your child. The plan you choose has to be right for you. Here are the three basic plans:

  • Open adoption. In an open adoption, you exchange all identifying information with the adoptive family. Full names, addresses, email, and phone numbers are shared. You have the opportunity to set up meetings, be a part of your child’s life, and even participate in important life events. Women find comfort in seeing their adopted child happy and healthy.
  • Closed adoption. If you would rather remain completely anonymous, you would choose a closed adoption. Your adoption coordinator would choose the adoptive family based on your requests. No identifying information is shared, and the original birth certificate is sealed to protect your identity.
  • Semi-open adoption. This is a plan somewhere in between the first two. First names are exchanged, but contact is done through your adoption coordinator. Photos, letters, and emails are sent to the coordinator first who forwards them on to the family. They in turn can communicate with you the same way.

How can we help you?

No one would ever say choosing adoption is easy. It’s a tough decision because you care deeply for your child. You want them to have the best future possible, and sometimes that requires another family. That’s okay because you will always be a part of your child’s life story.

There’s so much more to learn about this option. We can provide you with information as well as referrals to agencies. Together, we can discuss if making an adoption plan is right for you. In the end, you’ll have done everything possible to give your child a chance at a safe and stable home environment, a good education, financial security, and a happy life.